Linux Mint 19.2 “Tina” Cinnamon Now Available, IBM Has Transformed Its Software to Be Cloud-Native and Run on Any Cloud with Red Hat OpenShift, Icinga Web 2.7.0 Released, Google Rolling Out Android Auto Design Updates and Kernel 5.1 Reaches End of Life

News briefs for August 2, 2019.

Linux Mint 19.2 "Tina" Cinnamon was officially released today. This is a long-term support release that will be supported until 2023, and it brings updated software and many improvements. Go here to read about all the new features.

IBM yesterday announced it has transformed its software to be cloud-native and run on any cloud with Red Hat OpenShift. From the announcement: "Enterprises can now build mission-critical applications once and run them on all leading public clouds, including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, Alibaba and IBM Cloud and on private clouds. The new cloud-native capabilities will be delivered as pre-integrated solutions called IBM Cloud Paks." IBM also announced Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Cloud, Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Z and LinuxOne, and consulting and technology services for Red Hat.

Icinga Web 2.7.0 was released this week. Improvements include Japanese and Ukranian language support, bonus functionality for Modules, an enhanced UI and much more. You can get the official packages from packages.icinga.com.

Google begins rolling out new Android Auto design updates. ZDNet reports that "the new Android Auto starts playing media and Google Maps as soon as the car starts. Maps will also show suggested locations. If a route has already been planned on a phone, Android Auto automatically adds the directions and displays routing information....Android Auto now also can use widescreen displays to give extra space for step-by-step navigation, media playback, and call controls. Changes to improve visibility include easier-to-read fonts and a new dark mode. Overall, the design changes are meant to get users on the road faster and allow easier management of apps with fewer taps."

Greg Kroah-Hartman recently announced that Linux kernel 5.1 has reached end of life: "Everyone should be moved to the 5.2.y kernel at this point in time. 5.1.y is now end-of-life."